Vital Records

 

 

 

Wikipedia/Alex Horn (excerpt):

 

His groups have been classed by some as cults, although others believe he was attempting to promote the Fourth Way, which can involve a degree of intense confrontation on a personal level. Alex was married to Anne Burrage (later Anne Haas) in the 1960s during which time he was running Red Mountain Ranch, a part-time commune located on Sonoma Mountain in northern California.

 

The order of events is unclear, but. . .

 

Alex and Sharon [Horn] ran the Theatre of All Possibilities until 1978 when it received unfavorable press from the San Francisco Chronicle[1] and San Francisco Progress[2][3][4][5][6] in the wake of the Jim Jones tragedy in November 1978. Alex and Sharon both left San Francisco in 1978 and reportedly continued to run various groups in New York and Boston. Alex Horn had five children with Anne Burrage, Maurice, Elaine, Matthew, Mary Ellen and Benjamin. Alex Horn died on September 30, 2007.

 

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According to his Certificate of Birth, Alexander Francis Horn was born in Mt. Sinai Hospital, August 14, 1929.

 

His mother Laura was a 22 year-old housewife, born in Chicago.

 

His father Maurice was a 45 year-old electrician, born in Philadelphia, Penn.

 

Maurice and Laura were residing at 4312 Washington Blvd.

 

 

April 10, 1930 Cook County Census shows that Maurice, Laura, and Alexander were residing at 315 Central Park Avenue.

 

 

A Marriage License shows that Mr. Maurice C. Horn was 55 and Miss Laura De Lallo was 31 when they got married in Cook county, January 11, 1939.

 

 

A Medical Certificate of Death shows that Maurice C. Horn died

 

November 29, 1939 at 4:15 a.m.

 

Age: about 58

Immediate cause of death: coronary thrombosis

Place of residence: 768 W. Jackson Blvd.

Occupation: salesman 

Industry or business: lighting fixtures

Name of wife: Lois

Name of father: Alexander Horn

Father’s birthplace: Bucharest, Rumania

 

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Feb. 9, 1935 Chicago Tribune (excerpt):

 

Alexander Francis Horn, 5 years old, spread the alarm for a fire that broke out in his home early yesterday, and thereby became a hero in the eyes of 18 other persons who live under the same roof in the two flat building at 1649 South Homan avenue.

 

The boy’s mother, Mrs. Maurice C. Horn, wife of an electrical salesman, got up at 4:20 a.m. to take some medicine. Alexander was asleep in her bed. [Where was Mr. Horn?]  In other rooms on the same floor, the second, slept Leon and Tillie Spak, owners of the building, their three grown children, Anne, Ruth, and Al, as well as Mr. and Mrs. L. Rottenberg, who, like the Horns, are roomers.

 

A match Mrs. Horn had lighted [why?] set fire to the bed clothing [how?] while Mrs. Horn was locked in the bathroom. 

 

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1940 Census Record shows Alexander Horn, aged 10, as an inmate of the Marks Nathan Jewish Orphan Home in Chicago, where he is reported as having lived for the previous five years.
     
Indicating that Alex was 5 years old when he became “an inmate. . .”